Welcome to Admiring Cate Blanchett your source for Australian actress Cate Blanchett who is best known for her roles in 'The Lord of the Rings', 'The Hobbit', 'Cinderella' and more recently 'Carol', 'Song to Song' and 'Thor: Ragnarok'. Here at Cate-blanchett.net, we aim to provide you with all the latest news, images & so much more on Cate. Feel free to bookmark us and visit back daily for our latest updates!
January 18th, 2019 / No Comments

Annapurna Pictures has moved its Richard Linklater literary adaptation “Where’d You Go, Bernadette,” starring Cate Blanchett back five months from March 22 to an Aug. 9 release.

A rep for Annapurna explained that August has served well as a launching pad for release of female-skewing films such as “Crazy Rich Asians,” “Florence Foster Jenkins” and “Julie and Julia.” Additionally, “Where’d You Go, Bernadette” will offer a change of pace following a summer of sequels and action movies.

Blanchett stars in the title role along with Billy Crudup, Kristen Wiig, Emma Nelson, James Urbaniak, Judy Greer, Troian Bellisario, Zoë Chao and Laurence Fishburne. Linklater co-wrote with Holly Gent, Vincent Palmo Jr., Michael H. Weber and Scott Neustadter. Producers are Megan Ellison, Nina Jacobson, Bradford Simpson, and Ginger Sledge.

“Where’d You Go, Bernadette” is based upon the 2012 novel by Maria Semple. It follows the architect Bernadette Fox who goes missing just prior to a family vacation to Antarctica. The story is narrated by Bernadette’s 15-year-old daughter, who attempts to track down her reclusive mother.

“Where’d You Go, Bernadette” will open against Lionsgate’s “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark,” Bleecker Street’s “Brian Banks” and Disney’s “Artemis Fowl.” It’s Linklater’s 20th movie, including last year’s Bryan Cranston-Steve Carell-Laurence Fishburne drama “Last Flag Flying.” He received an Oscar nomination three years ago for “Boyhood.” [Source]

January 12th, 2019 / No Comments

Cate Blanchett has played queens, vagabonds and Bob Dylan. Now the double Oscar-winner is hitting the London stage and hinting at a farewell from acting. We talk to the team behind the avant garde play about sexual domination

Cate Blanchett strides into the room and plomps herself down on the sofa. In front of us – this is meant to be lunch – a table is piled high with sandwiches, fruit, salads and a copy of the script she has spent all morning rehearsing. She prods at it with a finger, hooting with laughter. “Any pointers?” she asks. I glance across at the other sofa, where Martin Crimp, the playwright, is settling himself in. He gazes back impassively. This might be a joke; it might not.

We’re backstage at the National Theatre to discuss Blanchett’s appearance in Crimp’s new play – her debut here, and her first appearance on the London stage in seven years. Also squeezing on to the sofas are Blanchett’s director, Katie Mitchell, and her co-star Stephen Dillane. To call the production hotly anticipated is something of an undersell: demand for tickets was so high that the theatre was forced to introduce a Hamilton-style ballot (a few day tickets are left, if you’re able to queue). Even from the vantage point of not-quite-mid-January, this looks like being one of the biggest plays of the year.

Working out what kind of play Crimp has come up with, however, is trickier, as Blanchett and her colleagues readily admit. Entitled When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, it is – at least on paper – a loose adaptation of Samuel Richardson’s 1740 proto-novel Pamela. Relating the story of a young maidservant’s relationship with her employer, the book scandalised readers when it was first published. Composed of a series of letters in which Pamela relates how she is pursued by the mysterious “Mr B”, then sexually assaulted, it ends with her finally (and apparently enthusiastically) agreeing to marry him. It’s been called everything from tawdry S&M to a set of case notes for Stockholm syndrome.

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November 21st, 2018 / No Comments

Due to expected high demand to see Cate Blanchett’s return to the the London Stage, the National Theatre has set up a ballot.

Tickets for When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other will not fo on general sale, with the theatre electing to operate a balloting system for the play’s six-week run, which begins in January.

The Australian-born, Academy Award-winning actress will appear in alongside Game Of Thrones actor Stephen Dillane, who returns to the National Theatre for the first time since The Coast Of Utopia in 2002.

According to the National Theatre, the play “breaks through the surface of contemporary debate to explore the messy, often violent nature of desire and the fluid, complicated roles that men and women play”.

The production is based on Samuel Richardson’s 1740 novel Pamela and sees “six characters act out a dangerous game of sexual domination and resistance”.

Blanchett has an extensive career on stage as well as starring in films including Notes On A Scandal, Blue Jasmine and Ocean’s 8.

The ballot opens at midday on Thursday, 22 November and runs until midday on Thursday November 29.

Tickets for the show, staged at the National’s Dorfman Theatre from January 16 to March 2 next year, are expected to cost from between £10 to £58. [Source]

November 8th, 2018 / No Comments

CATE BLANCHETT IS OUR WINTER 2018 COVER STAR!

Charming. Refined. A visionary artist with integrity and grace. This is Cate Blanchett.

Cate Blanchett is a surprise from the moment she shows up. Wearing jeans and a T-shirt and no makeup, she arrives alone at the seaside apartment by Manly Beach in Sydney, Australia. The only clue identifying her as the award-winning actress is that same husky voice from the silver screen: “Hi, I’m Cate. Sorry, I seem to have caught a cold on the plane.” Though she is known for her poised demeanour, the Australian actress and global ambassador for Giorgio Armani Beauty gives us a warm smile.

Even non-movie fans would surely be familiar with Blanchett, but this Hollywood A-lister rarely appears in entertainment headlines. A search engine can confirm that she recently settled in the English countryside, where she is raising four children with her writer- director husband, Andrew Upton.

BLANCHETT DOESN’T HAVE social-media accounts. Her viewpoint on this matter is clear: “There are two reasons: For me, it’s too time-consuming, and for the other, communications over the internet can become narrow and negative; they can incite jealousy or anger without the counterbalance of face-to-face accountability. I fear that much of our engagement with social media is ego-driven—and I like to separate the ego from the ideas.”

Her advice to young actors is to set aside their ego. “As an audience member, I’m never interested in the actors’ personal lives. I want to forget all that and immerse myself in their characters and the story they are telling. The tabloid gossip around actors just gets in the way of engaging with the work.”

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October 20th, 2018 / No Comments

The actress said she will “fight to the death for the right to suspend disbelief.”

Cate Blanchett came to the Rome Film Festival on Friday to participate in a “Close Encounter” discussion with the fest’s artistic director Antonio Monda.

Blanchett talked about her life’s work, joking that she had to act to find Brad Pitt sexy in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and admitting that she was so nervous to receive a phone call to work with Martin Scorsese in The Aviator, that she accepted the role without even understanding that she had committed to play Katharine Hepburn.

When looking at footage from Todd Haynes’ Carol, based on Patricia Highsmith’s novel about a forbidden love affair between two women, she said she had never been asked more questions about her sexuality than when she played a lesbian character. Many interviewers during the Carol junket seemed to imply or question whether having a lesbian experience was essential to understanding such a role.

For Blanchett, she believes this defies the whole point of acting. “It also speaks to something that I’m quite passionate about in storytelling generally, but in film specifically, is that film can be quite a literal medium,” she said.

“And I will fight to the death for the right to suspend disbelief and play roles beyond my experience. I think reality television and all that that entails had an extraordinary impact, a profound impact on the way we view the creation of character,” she continued.

“I think it provides a lot of opportunity, but the downside of it is that we now, particularly in America, I think, we expect and only expect people to make a profound connection to a character when it’s close to their experience,” she said.

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September 27th, 2018 / No Comments

With its mix of magic and mystery, The House with a Clock in its Walls – the first in the series of books by John Bellairs – has been compared to another master of magic, Harry Potter. Is it all an illusion?

“Doing this film was the happiest I’ve ever been on set,” says Cate Blanchett, flashing her familiar cat-got-the-cream smile, as she animatedly chats about her bewitching role as Florence Zimmerman, in the kids’ fantasy The House With a Clock in Its Walls.

It’s a surprising admission, given Blanchett’s penchant for dramatic, weighty film roles, beguiling theatre performances and her triumphant, Oscar-winning portrayals in The Aviator and Blue Jasmine.

“I loved playing a witch and loved doing this film because magic makes me scream,” she reveals, her eyes widening with unbridled excitement. “I have a cousin, who’s ten years older than me, and he’s also obsessed with magic. When I was a kid, we used to go to his family’s farm and we’d lock him in a room and make him perform magic for us. It was just stupid things, like pretending to take your nose off or cutting a lemon and out comes the card that you’ve picked, but I adored it.

“So, I was thrilled by the prospect of working on a film full of magic, based on a book that I’d known – and loved – from my childhood,” continues Blanchett, passionately. “I found the whole experience enthralling.”

“It was the same for me,” adds Jack Black, who co-stars with Blanchett as her madcap, mystical Warlock neighbour, Jonathan Barnavelt. “I like to do films that I have an opportunity to flex my muscles in, so getting the chance to play someone with magical powers and create an invisible energy ball, right in my hand, was a fun first. It was a great experience, one of the funniest films I’ve ever done.”

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September 26th, 2018 / No Comments

Cate Blanchett and Jack Black are trying to talk to me without moving their lips.

Except the word lips is actually really tricky to say in this manner, and they soon crack up laughing.

Some might think these two Hollywood stars – one (Black) known for more comic roles, the other more serious – are an odd pairing. But it’s clear from their joking around that they had fun filming together.

And they’re hilarious to watch as witch Florence and warlock Jonathan, in new fantasy adventure A House With A Clock In Its Walls. Particularly memorable are their one-liner insults to each other, some of which California-born Black, 49, says were improvised.

“‘Mush brush’ was my favourite,” Australian Blanchett, also 49, recalls with a grin. “It’s so easy to think up insults for men with facial hair.”

From Steven Spielberg’s production company Amblin Entertainment, the film is based on John Bellairs’ 1973 novel, and starts with orphan Lewis (Owen Vaccaro) moving to live with his uncle in a creaky old house.

“What I love about Florence, and Jonathan as well, is that their magic is broken, because they’ve both had tragedies in their lives,” says Blanchett, an Oscar-winner whose memorable roles include The Aviator, Carol, and the Lord Of The Rings trilogy.

“The strength, ingenuity and weirdness of this little boy that comes into their lives gives them courage to use their magic again.”

Lewis quickly realises his new home is far from ordinary, as Florence and Jonathan introduce him to a world full of spells, and a quest to discover the source of a mysterious tick tock noise coming from within the walls.

When the trio realise that, if the clock goes off inside the house, it’s going to send time backwards to before human beings even existed, it could well be down to Lewis to save them all.

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September 24th, 2018 / No Comments

Cate Blanchett took a break from the promotional tour for her new film, “The House With a Clock in Its Walls,” to travel to Milan with her son Roman for a weekend of fashion-related events.

At the Giorgio Armani show on Sunday morning, the 14-year-old boy warmly hugged Roberta Armani, the niece of the designer, and practiced Italian greetings with TV presenter Jo Squillo.

“We were overdue for a mother-son weekend and it was kind of a great confluence of events, really,” said Blanchett, who the previous evening attended parties hosted by W magazine and Pomellato, and also planned to go to the Green Carpet Fashion Awards on Sunday night.

The Giorgio Armani global beauty ambassador plays a witch opposite Jack Black in her new fantasy comedy, and she welcomed the way women are reclaiming the term.

The Australian actress was enjoying a weekend break in Milan with her son Roman.
By Joelle Diderich on September 23, 2018

View Gallery — 6 Photos

CASTING A SPELL: Cate Blanchett took a break from the promotional tour for her new film, “The House With a Clock in Its Walls,” to travel to Milan with her son Roman for a weekend of fashion-related events.

At the Giorgio Armani show on Sunday morning, the 14-year-old boy warmly hugged Roberta Armani, the niece of the designer, and practiced Italian greetings with TV presenter Jo Squillo.

“We were overdue for a mother-son weekend and it was kind of a great confluence of events, really,” said Blanchett, who the previous evening attended parties hosted by W magazine and Pomellato, and also planned to go to the Green Carpet Fashion Awards on Sunday night.

The Giorgio Armani global beauty ambassador plays a witch opposite Jack Black in her new fantasy comedy, and she welcomed the way women are reclaiming the term.

“I think it’s long had negative connotations or frightening connotations but, you know, we live in England where it’s quite a pagan country in a lot of ways, and witches were people that you went to for healing purposes, so they actually have incredibly ancient power and wisdom,” she mused.

Blanchett is gearing up to play comedian Lucille Ball in a biopic, but she hasn’t yet found her Desi Arnaz. “Aaron Sorkin is writing, and I think he’s delivering the script sometime soon, but I don’t know when, where or how,” she demurred.

Patrick Schwarzenegger, fresh off celebrating his 25th birthday earlier in the week, recently wrapped filming “Daniel Isn’t Real,” in which he plays the main character’s imaginary friend.

“It’s about a guy who’s kind of schizophrenic, who has voices in his head, and he develops this relationship with this voice in his head, his imaginary friend,” he explained.

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September 22nd, 2018 / No Comments

Years ago, Cate Blanchett said, someone told her, ″You have an actor’s face.″

″I think it was a compliment,″ the Australian actress, now 49, said with a laugh. “It’s that thing of not having any particular look, which is particularly helpful in my line of work. I’m not massively plain or massively beautiful. I have a foot in both camps.″

How people look on the inside, the two-time Oscar winner said, matters most to her when choosing roles.

″What’s interesting to me, when I approach a new character, is the flaws, the fears and that very human sense of incompleteness,″ she said. ″That’s the most beautiful thing of all for an actor.

″I even find myself in other people’s lives.″

That might include her character in Eli Roth’s ″The House With the Clock in Its Walls,″ which opened Friday in theaters.

Based on the novel by John Bellairs and produced by Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment, the film centers on Lewis Barnavelt (Owen Vaccaro), a young orphan who — along with his warlock Uncle Jonathan (Jack Black) and Jonathan’s next-door neighbor, the good witch Mrs. Zimmerman (Blanchett) — must find a clock that has the power to turn time backward.

″The clock wants to turn time back to before humans existed, and we have to stop it,″ Blanchett said during an interview in New York. ″It has that Spielberg magic that all of us try to catch.″

With horror master Roth shepherding the film, moviegoers can count on some chills.

For Blanchett, the role was atypical.

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September 21st, 2018 / No Comments

A psychic predicted that Cate Blanchett would play murdered Sunday Independent reporter Veronica Guerin in a film, she tells Aine O’Connor

The word from the interviewers who go before me is that Cate Blanchett and Jack Black are in great form.

When I get to them, Cate is eating chocolate and needs to stand up for a while, Jack wants to know how to spell my name, has Cate ever been to Dublin, and, if she had Guinness there, because it tastes better. He wants to know if I have ever heard of Marlay Park because he played there. “I did not have a ‘high five’ with Bono but I did stay in his hotel, by the river there, what’s that street where all the music is? Bible?” Temple Bar? “Temple, not Bible, of course!”

Cate has not only been to Dublin, but spent time filming there, she played our late colleague Veronica Guerin in Joel Schumacher’s moving film. “I had this very strange moment,” she says, describing how research for a role as a psychic two years before she ever heard of Veronica, led her to visit a psychic to learn how to use the cards.

“The psychic told me, ‘You’re going to play a writer, short hair, she dies before her time, she’s got some foreign sounding name, Guavin, something like that and you’re going to have two bodyguards’.”

She says she forgot about it until over two years later and the day they were filming Veronica’s murder. “The Gilligan case had been reopened and they were worried about security on set and I turned around covered in blood, with my short hair and there were two bodyguards and I thought ‘Oh my God, this feels really familiar. Oh my God, this is what the psychic said…’ it was really creepy.” We all agree, and Cate continues, “Speaking of creepy….”

“Nice segue!” Jack nods in approval. “She’s always getting us back on track, this one.”

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September 17th, 2018 / No Comments

A funny thing happened at the premiere of “The House With a Clock in Its Walls” at the TCL Chinese Theatre in Hollywood on Sunday: Several minutes into the movie, the screen abruptly froze on an image of Colleen Camp, who plays Jack Black’s nosy neighbor, Mrs. Hanchett, and her little dog, too.

Eli Roth jumped out of his seat and went into director mode to downplay what turned out to be an issue with the back-up projector, according to a Universal rep. “During a really, really scary scene, if we all hear Jack Black burping, it’s probably not going to work as well,” Roth explained to the packed house. “So if you can all bear with me, I think that we need [child star] Owen Vaccaro to stand up and lead us in a magical spell for us to restart the movie.”

Some of the younger audience members protested, despite the promise of an impromptu magic show. “We’ve only seen three minutes,” Roth said. “I know it seems like a long time, but trust me, it’s just three minutes. Owen!” he called out to his petite lead actor. “He didn’t know that he would have to do this, but I screwed it up,” Roth added. “Owen … is going to do a magical spell for all of us to restart the movie so that the projection goes perfectly. So, Owen, if you can lead everyone in group participation. … Just go!”

Vaccaro rose in front of the impatient crowd. “From Saturn to the sun … turn the movie back on!” he shouted while waving outstretched arms. Instantly, the opening credits rolled once again and Roth deadpanned: “Take two!”

Earlier, on the red carpet, shortly before Black crooned a classic by the Turtles (“We’re happy together/ So happy together,” Black sang during a group cast photo), Roth explained his inspiration for the abrupt departure into PG-rated material.

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September 6th, 2018 / No Comments

The two-time Oscar winner joins fellow honoree Steve McQueen at the British Academy’s annual L.A. event.

Cate Blanchett has already booked in at least one honor this awards season.

Announced Thursday, BAFTA’s L.A. branch is to present Blanchett with the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film at this year’s Britannia Awards on October 26.

The two-time Academy Award winner joins fellow honoree Steve McQueen, who is set to receive the John Schlesinger Britannia Award for Artistic Excellence in Directing.

Previous recipients of the Stanley Kubrick award include Matt Damon, Jodie Foster, Meryl Streep, Robert Downey Jr. and George Clooney.

“With an impressive and extensive repertoire of work on screen and stage, Cate’s award-winning talent is unprecedented, earning her international acclaim and numerous accolades,” said BAFTA Los Angeles chairman Kieran Breen. “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to celebrate her brilliant work by honoring her with this year’s Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film.” [Source]

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Current Projects


Ocean's Eight (2018)
Cate as Lou
Debbie Ocean gathers a crew to attempt an impossible heist at New York City's yearly Met Gala.
Genre: Crime
More Info | Photos | IMDb

Mowgli (2018)
Cate as Kaa
An orphaned boy is raised in the wild.
Genre: Drama
More Info | Photos | IMDb


Where'd You Go, Bernadette (2018)
Cate as Bernadette Fox
After her anxiety-ridden mother disappears, 15-year-old Bee does everything she can to track her down, discovering her troubled past in the process.
Genre: Comedy, Drama
More Info | Photos | IMDb


The House with a Clock in its Walls (2018)
Cate as Unknown
A young orphan named Lewis Barnavelt aids his magical uncle in locating a clock with the power to bring about the end of the world.
Genre: Fantasy, Horror, Mystery
More Info | Photos | IMDb
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