All posts under Interviews


Cate Blanchett and some co-stars of “Where’d You Go Bernadette” visited the Build Series at the Build Studio to talk about the movie. They gave an awesome interview and shared some info about the movie as well. You can watch the interview below and you can check the pictures in our gallery.

Cate Blanchett attended the “Where’d You Go Bernadette” movie screening in New York at Metrograph in August, 12. Check the red carpet pictures and also the pictures to her arriving to the event as well.









It’s safe to say Cate Blanchett point blank refuses to let Hollywood define her. Whether it’s endlessly swapping between hair colours (brown to blonde in two weeks, anyone?) or playing seriously iconic women (Queen Elizabeth I and an elf, to name just a few), she defies being typecast. And we love her for it.

Catching up at the launch of Armani Si Fiori, the perfume Blanchett has helped to make a household name, the Australian native revealed the pretty ugly smells she secretly loves, the acting tips she exchanged with Margot Robbie, and her tricks for telling anxiety to get back in its box.

Red carpets can be nerve wracking, how do you overcome the jitters?

‘I think the more relaxed you can feel in any situation, whether it’s public or private, the more yourself you can be. Going on stage is up there on the nerve wracking scale! I tell my children that the feeling of anxiety is very close to the feeling of excitement, so I try and tell myself that I’m excited, not anxious. It’s a trick of the mind.’

What’s your go-to beauty look for feeling confident?

‘Someone else doing my hair and make-up! I don’t have a go-to look, I just have this ability to short circuit other people’s expectations and judgements on how I look. Maybe it’s because I’ve played so many different characters and looked so different, on camera and on stage, that my sense of self is very fluid. I don’t dress on the red carpet to get a thumbs up or thumbs down, I couldn’t care less. The secret is: don’t Google yourself and close down your social media accounts. It’s liberating.’

Which women have inspired you to be bolder in your career?

‘Gosh! I think about a young woman like Rosa Parks, or Cathy Freeman who’s an indigenous athlete in Australia. When I was younger I was quite obsessed with Frida Kahlo, Georgia O’Keefe and Lee Miller – they all broke a lot of boundaries.

‘I was incredibly nervous about playing Queen Elizabeth I – I actually spoke to Margot Robbie about this recently. When I heard she was playing the role I was super pleased. I said at the time when I played her, ‘Judi Dench played this role, who am I? Some nobody Australian! I’m going from the colonies to playing the great defining queen of England!’, and Margot said the same thing. We both agreed that it was a daunting role to take on, both as an actress, but also as an Australian actress.’ Keep reading »

Cate Blanchett does not play nice. Her performances almost always hinge on the unhinged. Although she is nothing if not regal—audiences will forever remember her as Queen Elizabeth I, a part that earned her the first of her seven Oscar nominations—Blanchett has never backed away from malice and mania, or what she describes as the “King Lear end of the spectrum.” The 49-year-old Australian actress has stalked down the darker corridors of human complexity by inhabiting a sexually repressed housewife in Carol, a shrill and martini-drowned socialite in Blue Jasmine, and, most recently, an agoraphobic architect in Richard Linklater’s adaptation of the Maria Semple novel Where’d You Go, Bernadette, out later this year. And yet, from a hotel room near London’s National Theatre, where she has been taking the stage in a production of When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, Blanchett wonders whether enough is enough. From across the ocean, at home in Los Angeles, Julia Roberts helps her grapple with the answer.

JULIA ROBERTS: Hello, Queen Cate.

CATE BLANCHETT: Hello, movie star. You want to know something? We just had your film Ben Is Back on, I kid you not. It made me cry after five minutes. And then, being totally brain-dead, I suddenly thought, “What day is it?” An alarm went off in my head, and I went, “I’ve got to go talk to that actress lady!”

ROBERTS: You want to talk about being brain-dead? I’ve had the craziest day. I woke up sick, and I was at Urgent Care for an hour and a half with one of my son’s friends who cut his foot when he was surfing. He got eight stitches.

BLANCHETT: You are a good friend. I’ve just had a half-bottle of red after a rather challenging day of rehearsal for a play I’m doing at the National Theatre [When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other]. As you get older, acting just gets more and more humiliating. When I was younger, I would wonder why the older actors I admired kept talking about quitting. Now I realize it’s because they want to maintain a connection to the last shreds of their sanity. As I get older, I ask myself if I still want to submit myself to the shamanistic end of this profession and go completely into madness. It’s the King Lear end of the spectrum of what we do, right? So I’m on the proverbial couch thinking, “Do I want to go that direction, or do I actually want to live a life?” Keep reading »

Cate Blanchett appears in the newest ad campaign for Giorgio Armani’s Sì fragrance franchise, including a film lensed by Fleur Fortuné. Just prior to its release in early February, Blanchett shared with WWD some thoughts on perfume and acting.

WWD: How would you describe the Sì fragrance woman?

Cate Blanchett: The Sì woman — a woman I myself aspire to be — is adventurous, full of emotion, open to the world and experience, and comfortable in her own skin.

WWD: How does being the face of a fragrance differ from playing a role in a film?

C.B.: Being the so-called “face” of this fragrance — I think I’d prefer to say “the spirit” of this fragrance. So being this Sì “spirit” is all about creating an atmosphere in which I can inhabit myriad states. Being a Sì woman isn’t a static thing — it’s full of flow: joy, apprehension, excitement, desire, risk and frivolity. And love, bien sûr!

WWD: What are some early memories of perfume?

C.B.: The home of my childhood was always fragrant — a house full of women! Lavender, freesia, firewood, the smell of the sea, of whatever was cooking. I remember my grandmother always smelling of violets and my mother of citrus. Fragrance, like music, always lifts my spirits.

WWD: What do you like in a fragrance?
Keep reading »

Cate Blanchett covers Vanity Fair Italy, on stands the next October 3, 2018. Don’t forget to buy the magazine. Below you can read a part of the interview. Will add the scans as soon as I get these.

Cate Blanchett: «Il futuro che vorrei costruire»

Si dichiara femminista, e sa che «c’è ancora tanto da fare». Ma, dice, non è necessario radere al suolo il passato. È più importante credere nell’inclusione. Di tutte le «minoranze»

Qui un estratto dell’intervista di copertina pubblicata sul numero 39 di «Vanity Fair», in edicola fino al 3 ottobre 2018.

Cate Blanchett si è rotta un dito del piede poco prima di posare per le foto che vedete in queste pagine e di rilasciare l’intervista che state per leggere.
Niente di grave, incerti del mestiere. Il dito se lo è rotto saltando con troppa forza nell’enfasi interpretativa di un episodio di Documentary Now!, una serie ideata dagli stessi produttori dello show comico Saturday Night Live. Cate è stata chiamata a fare la parodia di un’artista-performer stile Marina Abramović.
«Una parodia o un omaggio?», si domanda, sorridendo, la splendida Cate durante questo nostro incontro, in qualità di global ambassador di Giorgio Armani Beauty.
Negli ultimi mesi, sui tappeti rossi – da Cannes, dove era presidente della giuria, a Venezia – è apparsa ancora più splendida e carismatica del solito, come se avesse raggiunto lo zenit dello stato di grazia e consapevolezza, capace di maneggiare alla perfezione, unica della sua specie, i segreti del divismo e del talento, della popolarità di massa e dell’indiscusso rispetto di registi, artisti, colleghi.

Tema del giorno: l’industria del cinema che cambia, le polemiche pro e contro Netflix. Lei come la vede?
«Lo streaming è una novità dirompente che serve ad aprire a un nuovo pubblico e a generare nuove forme di consumo del cinema. Probabilmente era anche una evoluzione inevitabile e necessaria, perché ha messo in discussione un sistema che si stava avvitando su se stesso: stessi film, sequel e prequel, stessi cliché e stesse strategie di marketing. Ma non ha senso dire che il cinema in sala non esiste più, queste esperienze possono coesistere. I festival, per esempio, continuano ad avere un grande valore perché hanno quel sapore di “evento” che inevitabilmente si perde se guardi un film a letto, in pigiama, addentando una pizza. Ma le cose diventano irrilevanti solo quando… diventano irrilevanti. E il cinema non lo è ancora». Keep reading »

Cate Blanchett has been to the Cannes Film Festival in various capacities since 1997, but this year she assumes a far weightier role as president of the jury — an honor made even more significant in that it’s only the 12th time a woman has filled that seat. The glaring gender gap is not lost on Blanchett. Nor is the fact that in the festival’s seven-decade history, “The Piano” director Jane Campion is the only woman to have ever won the prestigious Palme d’Or.

Blanchett remembers being appalled to see Campion, who presided over the jury in 2014, conspicuously standing on the Palais stage at Cannes’ 50th-anniversary ceremony surrounded by an all-male coterie of auteurs who had also taken home the festival’s most coveted prize.

“Sometimes, things have to get that bad and that stark for us to say, ‘Hang on a minute. There’s something wrong — literally — with this picture,’” says Blanchett.

In a frank, wide-ranging interview with Variety, the two-time Oscar-winning actress of “Blue Jasmine” and “The Aviator” speaks candidly about the chronic suppression of women and the lack of opportunities they’ve endured. She believes that positive, irreversible strides are being made toward real change in an industry long known for male entitlement and domination. “We’re not going back to ground zero,” vows Blanchett, who’s among many high-profile women in Hollywood supporting the Time’s Up initiative. “This conversation has been had by so many individual women in isolated places for decades. What is different now is the collective, cross-industry nature of this movement.” At the same, she stresses that there’s still much to be done to level the playing field, be that on set, on-screen or in executive suites.

Blanchett, 48, assails the industry’s egregious pay inequities, and reveals for the first time that she, like other top actresses — Jennifer Lawrence, Michelle Williams and Claire Foy among them — has been denied compensation commensurate with that of her male counterparts. “It’s a huge issue. Show me one industry that has equal pay for equal work,” she says.

Also a first: Blanchett divulges her disdain for Harvey Weinstein, who she volunteers was an unwanted producer on several of her movies, including Todd Haynes’ “Carol,” which debuted in Cannes three years ago and starred Blanchett and Rooney Mara as forbidden lovers in the 1950s. Keep reading »

The latest installment of Giorgio Armani’s blockbuster fragrance is here: meet Sì Passione. The juice is a little spicier, the bottle a bit flashier, but the face, Cate Blanchett, remains the same (don’t mess with perfection, we say).

On a recent stopover in Sydney to fete the new fragrance, the Oscar-winning actress sat down with ELLE to chat about the scent, plus her excitement around Ocean’s 8

Tell us about Sì Passione…

“It’s yet another extension of the Sì story that probably speaks to Mr Armani’s restlessness, like he’s never content to just make one extraordinary fragrance and he always expands it to several more [laughs]. But just on an appealing aesthetic level, I love the bottle because it also speaks to his long love of Asian aesthetics with the beautiful red lacquer. As far as the scent, it’s an extension of the blackcurrant but what makes it really special is, I think, the pink pepper.”

Do you have a favourite version of Sì?…

“I think it’s probably Intense. I just like the way it develops on me. It’s one of those scents that during the day is really wonderful but it becomes particularly sensual in the evening.”

Armani says that Sì is his tribute to “modern femininity, an irresistible combination of grace, strength and independent spirit”, and that feels even more relevant today than it did five years ago. How does that message resonate with you now?…

“When Mr Armani approached me, of course I was unbelievably flattered and daunted at the fact that he thought that I could embody all these qualities. What an incredible vote of confidence! But I was so excited by just the positive nature of having a perfume called ‘Yes!’ and putting it on every morning as a woman. We’ve been really aware of what we’ve been saying ‘No’ to at the moment and so it really is such a game-changer when you start to say ‘Yes’. Often you need to say “No” to things to work out what you want, but then saying ‘Yes’ is just so full of opportunity.” Keep reading »

A news anchor, a widow, a bearded drunk … Cate Blanchett’s new film sees the actor take on 13 personas in a script cribbed from 50 revolutionary texts. She and director Julian Rosefeldt explain why Manifesto is an artistic call to arms in the age of Trump

Here’s Cate Blanchett as you’ve never seen her before: as a bearded old man pulling a shopping cart through a post-industrial wasteland. In a drunken Scottish accent he/she proclaims: “We glorify the revolution aloud as the only engine of life. We glorify the vibrations of the inventors young and strong. They carry the flaming torch of the revolution!” Now Blanchett is a grieving widow telling a funeral congregation, “to lick the penumbra and float in the big mouth filled with honey and excrement”. Now she’s an American news anchor in the studio, talking to a reporter standing in the rain under an umbrella. The reporter is also Blanchett. “Well Cate, perhaps this could all be dealt with if man was not facing a black hole,” she tells her other self. Now she’s a 1950s mother, clasping her hands in prayer before the Thanksgiving family dinner: “I am for art that comes out of a chimney like black hair and scatters in the sky,” she murmurs, as the children eye the turkey hungrily.

These are not clips from the two-time Oscar-winning actor’s showreel; this is Manifesto, originally a multi-screen gallery installation, now an unclassifiable feature directed by German artist and film-maker Julian Rosefeldt. The script is collaged from more than 50 artists’ manifestos from the past century, and recited by 13 different Blanchetts.

Today, the actor is in another persona – different from any of her characters in the film, or any previous roles. Certainly different from her current turn as a green-screen-chewing, emo-styled goddess of destruction in Thor: Ragnarok. This is Blanchett as artistic collaborator. Sipping tea alongside Rosefeldt in a London hotel suite, discussing big ideas in overlapping sentences, they are an articulate double act.

“Well the first thing is: is it a film?” Blanchett begins.

“She keeps asking that,” says Rosefeldt. Keep reading »

Strange but true: every Marvel Cinematic Universe villain up until Thor: Ragnarok has been male. Sure, there have been female henchwoman (Nebula, Ellen Brandt) but the main villains – always a guy. It’s pretty shocking that over sixteen films and nearly ten years, not a single woman has been the ‘big bad’. That all changes with Thor: Ragnarok as Cate Blanchett costars as the film’s heavy: Hela, The Goddess of Death.

On the set of Thor: Ragnarok, every actor – Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston, Tessa Thompson – all praised Blanchett, citing her performance as the gold standard for future Marvel villains. Blanchett, herself, seemed to be having a ball, chewing the scenery away from even Loki. You haven’t lived until you’ve seen an Oscar-winning actress, decked out with mo-cap dots and heavy Goth eyeliner, pantomime throwing force-field bombs with her hands. It may have taken sixteen films – but the MCU not only has its first female villain but also (seemingly) one of its best.

In the following group on-set interview with Cate Blanchett, the actress discusses portraying Marvel’s first female villain, finding the right tone for the performance and whether Hela will factor into the larger Marvel Cinematic Universe. For the full interview, read below.

What can you tell us about playing Hela?

CATE BLANCHETT: Well — she’s the Goddess of Death, but what I liked about playing her was that I really didn’t know anything about her. Obviously, the deep, hardcore fan base knows a lot. [But for me] there was a really interesting process of discovery. Like with any of the of the Marvel characters, they have really interesting and varied backstories… Keep reading »

Cate Blanchett doesn’t really feel like she needs to explain her character Hela in Thor: Ragnarok — she’s the Goddess of Death. Quips the actress, “I think that’s where you put the period in the sentence, right? She arrives with a lot of baggage. She’s a little bit cross.”

Hela is more than “a little bit cross” as she is freed from her prison early in Ragnarok and causes all sorts of chaos befitting her name. “She’s been locked away for millennia, getting more and more cross, and then, with a mistake, she get unleashed and she ain’t getting back in that box,” says Blanchett.

Hela may be a monster, but Blanchett is a delight and clearly had a blast tapping into her dark side. EW talked to the two time Oscar-winner about playing Thor’s first female villain and making weapons out of her body.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: What made you want to be part of this?
CATE BLANCHETT: Well let’s face it: as a woman, these opportunities have not in the past come up very frequently and I think there’s a revolution happening from within Marvel. I’ve seen so many of the Marvel franchises, particularly being the mother of four. They tend to be the only type of film particularly having young boys. But for me as an actor, this is separate is my desire to work with [director] Taika Waititi.

How did he sell you on this?
Well I had seen his vampire movie [What We Do in the Shadows] and Hunt for the Wilderpeople. I was trying to get my head around the collision of his sensibility as a director and what had previously existed in the Thor franchise and I thought that’s going to be interesting to say the least and I thought it could produce an interesting combustible connection because tonally his work is so different from what previously existed. Obviously they wanted to do something fresh and different, which is always exciting. Keep reading »

The Oscar-winner adores Wilton’s Music Hall, heeds advice from Dame Judi Dench and craves Fischer’s sausage and sauerkraut

Home is…

A work in progress. At the moment it’s somewhere between New York, where I’m doing an Ocean’s film, Sydney, where my husband is currently directing a play, and just outside London in the country.

Last play you saw?

We took our boys to see The Play That Goes Wrong in the West End and absolutely loved it. They peed their pants. Before that it was One Man, Two Guvnors, which was more elevated emotionally and psychologically for them.

Most romantic thing someone’s done for you?

Taken me out for lunch and then taken me out for dinner. On the same day.

Favourite shops?

Labour and Wait in Shoreditch. I love that it stocks utilitarian objects for everything from the garden to camping trips. I also love Daunt Books and Mint interiors in Kensington. Lina, the owner, has the most extraordinary eye and does interesting collaborations with artists and designers.  Keep reading »




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