Welcome to Admiring Cate Blanchett your source for Australian actress Cate Blanchett who is best known for her roles in 'The Lord of the Rings', 'The Hobbit', 'Cinderella' and more recently 'Carol', 'Song to Song' and 'Thor: Ragnarok'. Here at Cate-blanchett.net, we aim to provide you with all the latest news, images & so much more on Cate. Feel free to bookmark us and visit back daily for our latest updates!
November 17th, 2017 / No Comments

A news anchor, a widow, a bearded drunk … Cate Blanchett’s new film sees the actor take on 13 personas in a script cribbed from 50 revolutionary texts. She and director Julian Rosefeldt explain why Manifesto is an artistic call to arms in the age of Trump

Here’s Cate Blanchett as you’ve never seen her before: as a bearded old man pulling a shopping cart through a post-industrial wasteland. In a drunken Scottish accent he/she proclaims: “We glorify the revolution aloud as the only engine of life. We glorify the vibrations of the inventors young and strong. They carry the flaming torch of the revolution!” Now Blanchett is a grieving widow telling a funeral congregation, “to lick the penumbra and float in the big mouth filled with honey and excrement”. Now she’s an American news anchor in the studio, talking to a reporter standing in the rain under an umbrella. The reporter is also Blanchett. “Well Cate, perhaps this could all be dealt with if man was not facing a black hole,” she tells her other self. Now she’s a 1950s mother, clasping her hands in prayer before the Thanksgiving family dinner: “I am for art that comes out of a chimney like black hair and scatters in the sky,” she murmurs, as the children eye the turkey hungrily.

These are not clips from the two-time Oscar-winning actor’s showreel; this is Manifesto, originally a multi-screen gallery installation, now an unclassifiable feature directed by German artist and film-maker Julian Rosefeldt. The script is collaged from more than 50 artists’ manifestos from the past century, and recited by 13 different Blanchetts.

Today, the actor is in another persona – different from any of her characters in the film, or any previous roles. Certainly different from her current turn as a green-screen-chewing, emo-styled goddess of destruction in Thor: Ragnarok. This is Blanchett as artistic collaborator. Sipping tea alongside Rosefeldt in a London hotel suite, discussing big ideas in overlapping sentences, they are an articulate double act.

“Well the first thing is: is it a film?” Blanchett begins.

“She keeps asking that,” says Rosefeldt.

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October 11th, 2017 / No Comments

Strange but true: every Marvel Cinematic Universe villain up until Thor: Ragnarok has been male. Sure, there have been female henchwoman (Nebula, Ellen Brandt) but the main villains – always a guy. It’s pretty shocking that over sixteen films and nearly ten years, not a single woman has been the ‘big bad’. That all changes with Thor: Ragnarok as Cate Blanchett costars as the film’s heavy: Hela, The Goddess of Death.

On the set of Thor: Ragnarok, every actor – Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston, Tessa Thompson – all praised Blanchett, citing her performance as the gold standard for future Marvel villains. Blanchett, herself, seemed to be having a ball, chewing the scenery away from even Loki. You haven’t lived until you’ve seen an Oscar-winning actress, decked out with mo-cap dots and heavy Goth eyeliner, pantomime throwing force-field bombs with her hands. It may have taken sixteen films – but the MCU not only has its first female villain but also (seemingly) one of its best.

In the following group on-set interview with Cate Blanchett, the actress discusses portraying Marvel’s first female villain, finding the right tone for the performance and whether Hela will factor into the larger Marvel Cinematic Universe. For the full interview, read below.

What can you tell us about playing Hela?

CATE BLANCHETT: Well — she’s the Goddess of Death, but what I liked about playing her was that I really didn’t know anything about her. Obviously, the deep, hardcore fan base knows a lot. [But for me] there was a really interesting process of discovery. Like with any of the of the Marvel characters, they have really interesting and varied backstories…

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March 12th, 2017 / No Comments

Cate Blanchett doesn’t really feel like she needs to explain her character Hela in Thor: Ragnarok — she’s the Goddess of Death. Quips the actress, “I think that’s where you put the period in the sentence, right? She arrives with a lot of baggage. She’s a little bit cross.”

Hela is more than “a little bit cross” as she is freed from her prison early in Ragnarok and causes all sorts of chaos befitting her name. “She’s been locked away for millennia, getting more and more cross, and then, with a mistake, she get unleashed and she ain’t getting back in that box,” says Blanchett.

Hela may be a monster, but Blanchett is a delight and clearly had a blast tapping into her dark side. EW talked to the two time Oscar-winner about playing Thor’s first female villain and making weapons out of her body.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: What made you want to be part of this?
CATE BLANCHETT: Well let’s face it: as a woman, these opportunities have not in the past come up very frequently and I think there’s a revolution happening from within Marvel. I’ve seen so many of the Marvel franchises, particularly being the mother of four. They tend to be the only type of film particularly having young boys. But for me as an actor, this is separate is my desire to work with [director] Taika Waititi.

How did he sell you on this?
Well I had seen his vampire movie [What We Do in the Shadows] and Hunt for the Wilderpeople. I was trying to get my head around the collision of his sensibility as a director and what had previously existed in the Thor franchise and I thought that’s going to be interesting to say the least and I thought it could produce an interesting combustible connection because tonally his work is so different from what previously existed. Obviously they wanted to do something fresh and different, which is always exciting.

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December 18th, 2016 / No Comments

The Oscar-winner adores Wilton’s Music Hall, heeds advice from Dame Judi Dench and craves Fischer’s sausage and sauerkraut

Home is…

A work in progress. At the moment it’s somewhere between New York, where I’m doing an Ocean’s film, Sydney, where my husband is currently directing a play, and just outside London in the country.

Last play you saw?

We took our boys to see The Play That Goes Wrong in the West End and absolutely loved it. They peed their pants. Before that it was One Man, Two Guvnors, which was more elevated emotionally and psychologically for them.

Most romantic thing someone’s done for you?

Taken me out for lunch and then taken me out for dinner. On the same day.

Favourite shops?

Labour and Wait in Shoreditch. I love that it stocks utilitarian objects for everything from the garden to camping trips. I also love Daunt Books and Mint interiors in Kensington. Lina, the owner, has the most extraordinary eye and does interesting collaborations with artists and designers. 

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December 2nd, 2016 / No Comments

The one benefit to interviewing Cate Blanchett on the phone, rather than in person, is not having to stare at her luminous lit-from-within skin, penetrating feline eyes, and sky-high cheekbones and feel utterly inferior. Of course, just talking to her offers its own lessons in humility. Her resonant, surprisingly husky voice—her accent leans toward BBC English, with only sporadic appearances by nasally Aussie vowels—drips with intelligence, and she’ll almost always choose a four-syllable word over its simpler cousin. She answers in paragraphs, not short sentences, and you get the feeling she could go on about Chekhov for hours—which she might if she weren’t at home in East Sussex, England, on a Friday night, fielding questions from her three boys, ages 15, 12, and 8, and worrying that her nearly-2-year-old daughter might wake up.

This month, Blanchett makes her Broadway debut in The Present, a reimagining of Chekhov’s first play, the sprawling, unpublished epic Platonov. The playwright Andrew Upton, Blanchett’s husband and frequent collaborator, adapted it for the Sydney Theatre Company in 2015, and the entire cast—including Richard Roxburgh, who plays Platonov—have made the transfer to New York. Blanchett and Upton served as co–artistic directors of the Sydney Theatre Company from 2008 to 2012, producing dozens of critically acclaimed works, including four others that played off-Broadway in New York with Blanchett in starring roles: A Streetcar Named Desire, Uncle Vanya, The Maids, and Hedda Gabler. Upton stayed on as artistic director until 2016, while Blanchett filmed Blue Jasmine, Cinderella, and Carol, and this production of The Present serves as the final act from their tenure in Sydney. “I’m excited to see what New York audiences make of it,” Blanchett says. “Hopefully there’s an appetite for it.”

Obviously, there will be. Blanchett’s name has been synonymous with quality since her star-making turn in Elizabeth in 1998, and theatergoers who have been lucky enough to score tickets to her prior New York productions still brag about seeing her in the flesh. It’s obvious that she loves performing in any arena, but being on stage is different. “Theater is not just the presentation of some work of literature,” she says, the passion rising in her voice. “It’s this living, breathing, bastard form, and that beating heart of the work comes alive when you have a full house.”

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October 25th, 2016 / No Comments

Oscar winner also spoke to EW about starring in ‘Where’d You Go, Bernadette’ and making her Broadway debut

Cate Blanchett has recently had what she describes as a very low-key time in her life. “I took a big chunk of time off to be with my family — we adopted our little girl — and it’s been a lovely, quiet year,” she says. We’re guessing that’s going to change because Blanchett is about to become very, very busy indeed.

She recently arrived in New York City to begin work on Ocean’s Eight (alongside Sandra Bullock, Anne Hathaway, Helena Bonham Carter, Sarah Paulson, Rihanna, Mindy Kaling, and Awkwafina), and from there will go directly into her Broadway debut starring alongside Richard Roxburgh in The Present, directed by John Crowley (Brooklyn). And that’s all before she gets to work on Where’d You Go, Bernadette, adapted from the 2012 best-selling and beloved Maria Semple novel with Richard Linklater directing, or to get her chance to play the great Lucille Ball in an authorized film — produced by Lucie Arnaz and Desi Arnaz Jr. — about Lucy and Desi Arnaz. Oh, and somewhere in there, she found time to shoot Thor: Ragnarok. We caught up with the two-time Oscar winner to discuss it all.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: You are playing the bad guy in Thor, right?
CATE BLANCHETT: Yes, You get to a certain age and you don’t play the hero anymore. [Laughs] You play villains. Villains and drunks.

Co-star Mark Ruffalo has described your character, Hela, as “the worst of the worst.”
Did he say that? Well, he’s the greenest of the green! I didn’t get to work so much with Mark, unfortunately. But I did get to work with Chris [Hemsworth] and talk about delightful! He’s just absolutely fabulous. The whole thing was just a riot and fantastic fun. Did you see [director] Taika Waititi’s film, Hunt for the Wilderpeople? Or, What We Do in the Shadows? He’s just got such a sure hand. He’s wonderful — I’d eat him for breakfast if I could. He’s absolutely delicious. And he’s irreverent which is great because Marvel, at its best, has its tongue firmly in its cheek.

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February 25th, 2016 / No Comments

It’s hard to think of many moments in the past decade when it could not have been said that Cate Blanchett was having kind of a big year. With that caveat: Cate Blanchett had a pretty big 2015.

This fall saw the release of two much-anticipated Blanchett vehicles: Carol, director Todd Haynes’s adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s 1952 novel The Price of Salt, and Truth, director James Vanderbilt’s adaptation of disgraced CBS News producer Mary Mapes’s 2005 memoir, Truth and Duty: The Press, The President, and the Privilege of Power.

Carol is the story of a forbidden mid-20th-century love affair between the titular character (Blanchett), a glamorous, wealthy middle-aged wife and mother, fighting for custody of her young daughter in the midst of a vicious divorce, and Therese (Rooney Mara), an aspiring photographer tentatively exploring the bounds of her own sexuality. Gorgeously art-directed and subtly told, Haynes’s film was revered by critics and recognized with six Oscar nominations, including nods for Blanchett and Mara (though notably not for Haynes in the coveted Best Director or Best Picture categories).

Truth, released only about a month before Carol, received less fanfare and was met with more controversy. In Vanderbilt’s film, Blanchett plays Mapes, the Texas-based 60 Minutes producer who was herself, in 2004, having kind of a big year. First she helped break the Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse story, a segment that would go on to win a Peabody Award. Then she uncovered evidence that President George W. Bush received preferential treatment during his service in the Texas Air National Guard. Under a time crunch, Mapes produced that piece with her mentor, longtime CBS Evening News anchor Dan Rather (played by Robert Redford), their case hinging on a series of damning memos leaked by a somewhat wobbly source.

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February 5th, 2016 / No Comments

In a conversation with The Envelope, Todd Haynes, director of the beautiful, spellbinding romance “Carol,” mentioned his three favorite scenes shared by his Oscar-nominated actresses Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara. Naturally, we had to ask the women about them too. Their reactions to Haynes’ choices — along with his own comments — provide a glimpse into the deliberate decisions and considerable challenges that went into making this celebrated film.

Scene 1: Carol drives Therese to her New Jersey home for the first time. In the novel, Patricia Highsmith writes: “They roared into the Lincoln Tunnel. A wild, inexplicable excitement mounted in Therese as she stared through the windshield. She wished the tunnel might cave in and kill them both, that their bodies might be dragged out together.”

Haynes: I read that and I thought, “Yes! That is … love!” It’s what you do in your mind when you fall in love. You’re so close to those moments that a trifle will set off a fantasy of suicide or some dramatic idea of dying with your loved one, just so you’re witnessed together for posterity. [Laughs]

It’s also a scene that created real practical problems shooting in Cincinnati because the length of the tunnel we used is about 200 yards. So we had to keep scheduling a drive through this tunnel over and over and over again. The tunnel was so short that daylight would start coming through almost immediately. So we shot it at like 4 in the morning after an already incredibly long day, using a police escort that took about 45 minutes just to do a circle and go back around again for what’s literally 30 seconds of shooting. 

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December 6th, 2015 / No Comments

After journeying to Middle-earth together for the “Lord of the Rings” movies, Cate Blanchett and Ian McKellen are playing more grounded roles in this year’s films. In “Mr. Holmes,” McKellen stars as the famous detective in old age. Blanchett pulls double duty in “Carol,” as a 1950s housewife who falls for a younger woman; and in “Truth,” in which she plays embattled “60 Minutes” producer Mary Mapes.

Ian McKellen: “Carol” is a love story, isn’t it?

Cate Blanchett: I don’t know if you’ve read “The Price of Salt.” It was Patricia Highsmith’s first novel. She writes about the really dark recesses of the human mind, which is what I love about her. And all these unpalatable thoughts and obsessions that we all have, but we never give voice to, or admit to anybody. And Phyllis Nagy wrote the most beautiful screenplay.

McKellen: And you can tell it’s a Todd Haynes movie right from the beginning.

Blanchett: I did another film called “Truth.” It’s about this producer, Mary Mapes, and Dan Rather, who was the anchorman for CBS. Mary produced this story about (George W.) Bush’s service in the Air National Guard. Subsequently, the story was picked apart, Dan stepped down as anchor, and Mary lost her job.

McKellen: Did you meet her?

Blanchett: I did.

McKellen: Are you anything like her? Is she anything like you?

Blanchett: I wish I had the same level of tenacity. She’s probably the only person who went into a war zone with a curling iron. She’s covered so many wars. But she’s sort of an amazing series of contradictions, incredibly passionate, and has a very strong moral core.

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November 16th, 2015 / No Comments

Cate Blanchett insists she is not the embodiment of perfection. We beg to differ.

In the fourth gallery of “Picasso Sculpture,” a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, Cate Blanchett stopped in front of an elegant, elongated woman assembled from wood and wire that looked like her. It was early October, and Blanchett had come to Manhattan from her home in Sydney to attend the New York Film Festival premiere of Carol, a love story between two women set in the 1950s (in theaters November 20). Blanchett, who was nursing a sore throat from too many flights and events, wore loose black slacks, a white shirt, flat shoes, a flower-print blazer, and pink aviator glasses. Her blonde hair was still damp from a shower, and she wasn’t wearing any makeup. She looked, as she invariably does, effortlessly beautiful. Unlike most actresses, her clothes had not been chosen by a stylist; they were a manifestation of her personality and current mood.

“I love these women,” Blanchett said enthusiastically of the sculpture and its four companions. “They remind me of Giacometti.” She launched into a story about male artists and their obsessions. “I read about this artist who left his girlfriend for four years. He wanted to make art away from any distractions, but he came home with four matchboxes filled with dust. He was so obsessed with her and with art that he ended up creating nothing. Every time I start a project—and I certainly felt this way with Carol—I have to embrace the fear that it might be a disaster. I like that feeling of consequence.” Blanchett gestured around the gallery at the variety of bodies and faces, all of them female. “Like being with these sculptures, making films is a little like existing in a dreamscape. You only reenter consciousness when the shooting is over.”

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September 12th, 2015 / No Comments

Carol, Laurel, Jules, Therese, Maud. These are just a few of the lead characters in a fall season that is by all accounts a big one for female-driven movies.

“Freeheld,” based on a documentary, stars Julianne Moore as the terminally ill New Jersey police detective Laurel Hester, who becomes an advocate for gay rights when government officials prevent her from assigning her pension benefits to her domestic partner (played by Ellen Page). Based on a Patricia Highsmith novel, “Carol” is a 1950s melodrama with Cate Blanchett as the married title character and Rooney Mara as her lover, Therese, that has already won accolades at Cannes. “Suffragette” tells the little-known story of the militant women’s emancipation movement in England, directed and written by women, with Carey Mulligan as Maud, a foot soldier in the fight. “The Intern,” directed by Nancy Meyers, follows Jules (Anne Hathaway), an Internet entrepreneur struggling to manage her company’s success with the help of an intern (Robert De Niro) who’s a senior citizen.

And there are more — “Brooklyn,” “Truth” and “Sisters,” to name a few. All are garnering attention, some are even the subject of Oscar talk, and yet their very existence is still a rarity in Hollywood.

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July 6th, 2015 / No Comments

The location for this interview is more than appropriate – the rooftop terrace of the Cannes Festival Palais, which Cate Blanchett has already ruled over with her enthusiastically received love drama Carol. At this point she does not know yet that the jury will ultimately overlook her performance as a New York socialite falling in love with an ambitious shop girl. But the broader verdict seems likely to go in her favor; the Australian actor is bound to dominate the next award season.

It will be an elegant dominance, if her demeanor in this interview — punctuated only by the occasional swear word and accented by open discussion of her sexual orientation and the involvement of her husband and children in her career — is anything to go by.

In what ways is this movie about gay characters relevant to our period of time?

There are many countries around the world where homosexuality is still illegal. What makes the film so special is that Todd (Haynes) thinks like an outsider, which what makes his relationships and his perspective on the world as a filmmaker so surprising and arresting. He’s described it as Romeo and Juliet, or rather Juliet and Juliet. These characters are falling love for the first time. Yes, it’s important it’s two women falling in love but it also describes the experience when you are connecting with someone deeply. The characters find that dangerous, not only because the love that they feel is illegal, but because it’s so alarming for them.

Everyone is in awe of your performance in this film…

Are they?

How do you prevent this from getting to your head? Doesn’t it drive you crazy when everybody is singing your praises?

That’s what they say to my face. I don’t know what they are saying behind my back. But it is really lovely that people are receiving it warmly. It has been a long labor of love for Phyllis Nagy, the writer, in particular. I have also been attached to the project a long time. And also working like someone with Todd, it really became a film when he came on board. It’s a collaborative process. But if you believe the good, you also have to believe the bad.

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Upcoming Appearances

December 03, 2017: Evening Standard Awards
December 07, 2017: IWC Filmmaker Award (Dubai International Film Festival)

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Current Projects


Song to Song (2017)
Cate as Amanda
Two intersecting love triangles. Obsession and betrayal set against the music scene in Austin, Texas.
Genre: Drama
More Info | Photos | IMDb


Thor: Ragnarok (2017)
Cate as Hela
Imprisoned, the mighty Thor finds himself in a lethal gladiatorial contest against the Hulk, his former ally. Thor must fight for survival and race against time to prevent the all-powerful Hela from destroying his home and the Asgardian civilization.
Genre: Action, Adventure, Fantasy
More Info | Photos | IMDb

Ocean's Eight (2018)
Cate as Lou
No plot yet.
Genre: Crime
More Info | Photos | IMDb

Jungle Book: Origins (2018)
Cate as Kaa
An orphaned boy is raised in the wild.
Genre: Drama
More Info | Photos | IMDb


Where'd You Go, Bernadette (2018)
Cate as Bernadette Fox
After her anxiety-ridden mother disappears, 15-year-old Bee does everything she can to track her down, discovering her troubled past in the process.
Genre: Comedy, Drama
More Info | Photos | IMDb


The House with a Clock in its Walls (2018)
Cate as Unknown
A young orphan named Lewis Barnavelt aids his magical uncle in locating a clock with the power to bring about the end of the world.
Genre: Fantasy, Horror, Mystery
More Info | Photos | IMDb
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